Control dlss 720p

We also wanted to ask Nvidia as many questions as we could to really dig into the current state of DLSS. This will include our usual suite of visual comparisons looking at DLSS compared to native image quality, resolution scaling, and various other post processing techniques. Strap yourselves in because this is going to be a comprehensive look at where DLSS stands today.

control dlss 720p

The idea was to improve gaming performance for those wanting to play at high resolutions with high quality settings, such as ray tracing.

It did this by rendering the game at a lower than native resolution, for example, p if your target resolution was 4K, and then upscaling it back to the native res using the power of AI and deep learning.

The goal was for this upscaling algorithm to provide native-level image quality with higher performance, giving RTX GPUs more value than they otherwise had at the time.

While these cores are most likely included on the GPU to make it also suitable for data center and workstation use cases, Nvidia found a way to use this hardware feature for gaming. While all this sounded promising, the execution within the first 9 months was far from perfect. Early DLSS implementations looked bad, producing a blurry image with artifacts. Battlefield V was a particularly egregious case, but even Metro Exodus failed to impress.

One of the major issues with the initial version of DLSS is that it did not provide an experience better than existing resolution scaling techniques. The implementation in Battlefield Vfor example, looked worse and performed worse than a simple resolution upscale.

Instead, for the short term they released a better sharpening filter for their FreeStyle tools that would enhance the resolution scaling experience, while they worked on a new version of DLSS in-house. The first step towards DLSS 2. For the sake of simplicity, we're going to call this DLSS 1. It also no longer requires per-game training, instead using a generalized training system, and it runs at higher performance.

Nvidia tells us that DLSS 2. Some visual details and comparisons are better noticed in motion. Watch the HUB video below for more. More so when you consider this is an approximation of the full technology running on the shader cores. The game allows you to select two render resolutions, which at 4K gives you the choice of p or p, depending on the level of performance and image quality you desire. DLSS with a p render resolution is the better of the two options.

The output quality is very good. We can also see that DLSS rendering at p is better than simply playing the game at p. These super fine wires or lines throughout the environment seem to consistently give DLSS the most trouble, although image quality for larger objects is decent. But the key difference between older versions of DLSS and this new version, is the performance.

Previously, running DLSS came with a performance hit relative to whatever resolution it was rendering at.But in order to experience it, you also need support from developers on a per-game basis. Thankfully, one of those games is Remedy Ent.

With this, the image is rendered at a lower than native resolution and then upscaled. The idea here is that by rendering the lower res image, you gain more performance while upscaling it to preserve all the details. DLSS 2. NVIDIA has not updated its neural network to be much faster and efficient, with the goal of producing much sharper and clearer images than before.

I took multiple screenshots at different scenes to get as much detail as possible out, with things like falling debris, screen-space reflections and text on objects in the distance.

Zoom in on the images here to see the difference for yourself. Notice when aiming the gun. As you can not see, DLSS 1. Alright, time to go full turbo. Be sure to click on the images to view them in their full size. Now, zoom in a little and you should be able to notice the new changes. You can Now that is impressive! Even with debris on the ground and finer edges like the text on the board, DLSS 2.

As you can see, performance is about the same and that makes sense as DLSS is rendering at a lower resolution. So, there you go. As we move towards the next generation of consolesI feel like upscaling and sharpening filters like these are going to provide a more efficient way of sustaining high framerates at higher resolutions like 4K.

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Control is the best, most complex implementation of ray tracing in a game so far

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The Best Motherboards for All Commerce Enterprise Entrepreneur Marketing.But in order to experience it, you also need support from developers on a per-game basis. Thankfully, one of those games is Remedy Ent. With this, the image is rendered at a lower than native resolution and then upscaled. The idea here is that by rendering the lower res image, you gain more performance while upscaling it to preserve all the details. DLSS 2. NVIDIA has not updated its neural network to be much faster and efficient, with the goal of producing much sharper and clearer images than before.

I took multiple screenshots at different scenes to get as much detail as possible out, with things like falling debris, screen-space reflections and text on objects in the distance. Zoom in on the images here to see the difference for yourself.

Control has great DLSS implementation, 1440p/Max settings with 60fps on NVIDIA GeForce RTX2080Ti

Notice when aiming the gun. As you can not see, DLSS 1. Alright, time to go full turbo. Be sure to click on the images to view them in their full size. Now, zoom in a little and you should be able to notice the new changes.

You can Now that is impressive! Even with debris on the ground and finer edges like the text on the board, DLSS 2.

control dlss 720p

As you can see, performance is about the same and that makes sense as DLSS is rendering at a lower resolution. So, there you go. As we move towards the next generation of consolesI feel like upscaling and sharpening filters like these are going to provide a more efficient way of sustaining high framerates at higher resolutions like 4K.

Source link. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Notify me of follow-up comments by email.

Notify me of new posts by email. Honor 9X Pro Review: Improvements come at a price. Stellar Data Recovery review: Powerful file retrieval tool review. Can low-cost, open-source ventilator designs help save lives? Please enter your comment! Please enter your name here.That rumour didn't last long. Stories last week suggested that the long awaited Switch Pro would arrive inwith Nintendo bringing the fight to the next-gen Microsoft and Sony console launches.

Nvidia DLSS in 2020: Stunning Results

It all sounded rather unlikely and Nintendo was quick to dismiss the story. The current Switch range continues to sell relentlessly and there's no substantial commercial reason for Nintendo to release a more powerful model quite yet - nor to go head-to-head with PS5 and Series X with what would almost certainly be less capable hardware.

However, the firm's partnership with Nvidia is likely to continue and three years on from the Switch's release, plans must surely be afoot for a next-gen system. On top of that, looking at how Nvidia's tech is evolving presents some mouthwatering opportunities for a new, more powerful Nintendo console hybrid.

Expectations should be tempered if the plan is to produce a more powerful console and nothing more. Fundamentally, compute power in a mobile device is limited by the need to accommodate a relatively small processor running at relatively minimal clock speeds. If we get anything close to the kind of performance we've enjoyed from PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, we should consider that a minor miracle for a system derived from a processor designed primarily for mobile gaming.

However, with that said, a new Switch based on more recent Nvidia technology opens the door to the firm's impressive AI upscaling techniques - and I decided to put them to the test in scenarios designed to more accurately represent Switch-level gaming.

I attacked this challenge on two fronts. First of all, AI upscaling technology is already available in a Tegra X1-based product - the newly revised Switch Android TV, a tubular revamp of the powerful streamer that Nvidia continues to support and upgrade. AI upscaling is exclusive to the new versions of the Shield, and works on any video content running on the machine - the only limitation being that anything above 30fps content is not supported.

And this led me to wonder: what if I fed the Shield with Switch capture? How would that look? I also thought about approaching this from the opposite direction. We've been quietly but cautiously excited by the DLSS AI upscaling tech found in recent games - it's a vastly improved proposition over some already impressive implementations in key PC games.

As we've already showcased, Wolfenstein Youngblood performs brilliantly under DLSS and in some scenarios, the upscaled version looks cleaner than the native presentation. So what if we dropped resolution to the Switch version's max p and used DLSS performance mode on the lowest settings? How would this compare with the Switch version? Our video breakdown in testing out AI upscaling of various flavours. Can machine learning work effectively in improving next-gen Switch visuals? We want to push visual features to the next level with technologies like real-time ray tracing, but we don't want to lose too much performance for the privilege.

Fundamentally, why use GPU resources to paint every single pixel when AI upscaling can 'infer' a lot of those pixels instead? Wolfenstein Youngblood and other freshly baked DLSS titles are showing some remarkably impressive results and the tech has a lot of potential. If the performance uptick is substantial and the quality is there, it could also be deployed in a mobile device where compute resources are extremely limited.

Instead of using DLSS to mitigate a performance loss from high-end features like ray tracing, instead we'd be using it purely to improve image quality - and it's no secret that Switch's most ambitious games do tend to be rather blurry, a factor of the low resolutions required in many cases. Even first-party Nintendo titles are affected here - Splatoon 2 and Super Mario Odyssey use dynamic resolution scaling and often reside in p territory. In the age of the 4K TV, docked play can look a little lacklustre in some cases.

The first order of business was to check out the new Shield's AI upscaling technology. As far as we know, the latest Tegra X1 doesn't feature the tensor cores designed for accelerated deep learning functions, so the process would likely be running on the X1's standard CUDA cores instead - which lie dormant otherwise during video playback. Full-fat DLSS reconstructs images based on a training algorithm derived from super-sampled images taken from each supported game.

I'd imagine that Shield's AI upscaling is something very different - and this is borne out by the results I received. If I had to guess, I'd suggest that the Shield AI upscaling blows up and attempts to intelligently sharpen the image, letting that extra 'detail' bleed out onto a 4K canvas.

You may see from the Doom 3 and Dragon Quest Builders 2 images below upscaled from native p that there is more detail resolved - but at the same time, I achieved very similar results from a Photoshop upscale and sharpen filter.But in order to experience it, you also need support from developers on a per-game basis.

Thankfully, one of those games is Remedy Ent. With this, the image is rendered at a lower than native resolution and then upscaled.

The idea here is that by rendering the lower res image, you gain more performance while upscaling it to preserve all the details. DLSS 2. NVIDIA has not updated its neural network to be much faster and efficient, with the goal of producing much sharper and clearer images than before.

I took multiple screenshots at different scenes to get as much detail as possible out, with things like falling debris, screen-space reflections and text on objects in the distance.

Zoom in on the images here to see the difference for yourself. Notice when aiming the gun. As you can not see, DLSS 1. Alright, time to go full turbo. Be sure to click on the images to view them in their full size. Now, zoom in a little and you should be able to notice the new changes. You can Now that is impressive! Even with debris on the ground and finer edges like the text on the board, DLSS 2. As you can see, performance is about the same and that makes sense as DLSS is rendering at a lower resolution.

So, there you go. As we move towards the next generation of consolesI feel like upscaling and sharpening filters like these are going to provide a more efficient way of sustaining high framerates at higher resolutions like 4K. Source link. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Thursday, April 9, Share this: Twitter Facebook. Honor 9X Pro Review: Improvements come at a price.But, the initial implementation of DLSS was version 1. X and not the same as the original that shipped out with games like Battlefield V and Metro Exodus. Rather than using the Tensor Cores, it used a form of temporal reconstruction to improve the image, and while it was a decent implementation we now see the game move on to a true DLSS 2. With the DLSS 2. Added into the mix is an extra option for the base resolution as the DLSS 1.

X only gave you two variables to work with, now with DLSS 2. The results should be, according to NVIDIA, much better than what we saw in the past and that's what we're here to take a look at. I do want to point out that we're having to work with a mix of old and new so we had to run the game in one version and capture the information and images before moving to the updated version with the latest drivers that implemented the new DLSS 2.

The series of images here are captured using GeForce Share with an RTX Ti at 4K in an effort to get the highest resolution image for inspection that we could get.

But remember there are some slight differences between the two versions as I had to update the game and drivers to get DLSS 2. As it replaces the options for the old DLSS there's not a way to flip back and forth, so we had one shot to get this in.

Unfortunately, I had already updated the game without realizing it since we were on a 'Review' version of the game, so we had to pull older images that I already had archived and use those as a point of comparison.

Now with those images, you'll be able open them up in their full resolution to inspect them more closely, but I would like to take a couple of side by sides that I took the liberty of zooming in greatly on to take a look at some of the more noticeable issues of the past DLSS implementations and show the impact of moving to this new solution. The foliage of the tree in the middle of the cafeteria was a point of contention in our original look at the game in article and video form.

It seemed to be the area of greatest detail loss in that case, but not so much anymore. When zoomed in we can see the leaves and the small branches become more defined and sharp, looking past that we can see the tiles on the wall have a much less soft look to them, even over the native image.

Another place I would like to bring some focus to is distant text.

How NVIDIA DLSS 2.0 can DOUBLE Your FPS! - The Tech Chap

You can see a very clear impact in the original DLSS 1. X implementation where the text on the sign is much muddier and even the small square sign over in the upper left-hand portion of the image gets impacted. But, with DLSS 2. Testing a game like Control presents its own set of issues since it's a non-linear game, but primarily indoors and does not have an in-game benchmarking utility we had to set up one for ourselves.

Just because the game takes place indoors doesn't mean there aren't large scale rooms, one being an insanely large furnace room for example, along with a plethora of geometry in each part of the Oldest House. We decided to go with a run from the Central Executive room through the Cafeteria and just into the Dead Letters room. Along this was we have plenty of varied light sources and surfaces to give an indicator of game performance, although we lack in combat sequences in this run the framerate doesn't appear to be too heavily impacted during fight scenes, that is something to take into consideration.

Once we had the results from 3 runs, after discarding an initial burner run for loading purposes, we took the average of average frame rates as well as the 99th percentile results from the run. For those uncertain of what the 99th percentile is, representing is easily explained as showing only 1 frame out of is slower than this frame rate. The RTX SUPER was used for p because this is the class of card typically under the most scrutiny for its DXR performance and visuals as well as the p resolution being one of the more difficult resolutions for the older Tensor Core based algorithm to work with.Control launched earlier this week, and it's a great game—it scored 88 in our review.

I've also put together a full suite of Control benchmarks to see what sort of hardware it needs to run well at various settings. The short summary: you'll need a beefy graphics card, and ray tracing doubles down on the beef. From a technology perspective, regardless of how you think Control looks, it does some cool stuff. Specifically, it's the most complete implementation of ray tracing via DirectX Raytracing, aka DXR that we've seen to date.

I want to talk about both, and I've got a lot of images and even a video or two to help. First, there's the ray tracing effects. The first game to use DXR was Battlefield 5, and you got exactly one effect: reflections.

control dlss 720p

Next to launch was Metro Exodus, with ray traced global illumination aka, indirect lighting and some ambient occlusion calculations. Then, roughly six months after launch, Shadow of the Tomb Raider added ray traced shadows—too bad most people had long since moved on to other games. Now along comes Control, and it has five ray tracing options: reflections, transparent reflections, indirect diffuse lighting, contact shadows, and debris.

The last one is more of an enhancement to the others, though—it just determines whether certain debris shows up in the RT effects or not. As expected, turning everything on pretty much tanks performance. Even the mighty RTX Ti barely manages to break 60 fps with all five ray tracing effects enabled. What do these ray tracing effects actually do, and are they worth the performance hit?

Let's take each in turn. Ray traced reflections show up in a lot of areas of Control. There are the usual puddles on the floor—and I have to wonder just how long it takes for water to evaporate in the Oldest House, and why isn't the janitor doing his job properly?

There are also shiny floors, walls, and other objects, because the janitor actually is pretty good at cleaning when he gets around to it. Finally, there are mirrors and windows, the latter being a bit of a special case. In the above comparisons, you can see that turning on ray traced reflections only affects the non-transparent surfaces. That sort of makes sense, considering the next option specifically addresses this.

Screen space reflections are disabled if you turn this on, which makes sense as both are doing the same thing.

That happens even in areas where there aren't any immediately obvious reflections, likely because the engine still has to spend time determining whether reflections are needed. Or perhaps there's a potential to optimize performance more. Transparent reflections are similar to the above, but they're only calculated for windows.

Basically, it's a partial reflection like you'd see in the real world. In the office areas with lots of glass windows, the effect is particularly striking. What's more, the performance hit isn't even that steep—enabling transparent reflections only drops framerates by around 5 percent on an RTX card depending on the scene, obviously, though even with no windows visible I still measured a consistent percent dip. One question that comes up is why SSR can't be used for transparent reflections.

The main difficulty with SSR is that it operates on the screen space—things that are already visible on the screen. Basically, it's some cool math to approximate reflections, and it works really well for things like puddles on the ground reflecting the sky. What it doesn't do very well is vertical objects facing the camera.

There are ways to approximate transparent reflections—or even to fully calculate them—without ray tracing, but the performance hit can be large, and Control opts to not even bother as far as I can tell. If you want windows that you can see through while also seeing a partial reflection in this game, you have to use ray tracing.

The name on this one is a bit tricky—indirect diffuse lighting. Are we talking about global illumination, or ambient occlusion, or maybe a bit of both?

control dlss 720p

I'm not quite sure. You can see in the images that it affects both lighting and shadows to varying degrees, and it does seem to overlap a bit with SSAO though that remains a togglable option. What I do know is that in testing, indirect diffuse lighting tends to be the most demanding of the ray tracing options in Control.


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